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Searching Content indexed under Disclosure & Electronic Discovery & Privilege by Day Pitney LLP ordered by Published Date Descending.
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NJ Supreme Court Considers Whether To Give Hospitals Access To OMNIA-Related Documents
Day Pitney litigator Mike Furey was quoted in three separate articles in Politico , the New Jersey Law Journal and Law360 regarding his oral argument before the New Jersey Supreme Court of an appeal...
United States
28 Jun 2017
2
Authenticating Social Media Evidence In NJ Courts
Mark Salah Morgan, Maureen C. Pavely and Michael L. Fialkoff authored an article, "Authenticating Social Media Evidence in NJ Courts," which was published by the New Jersey Law Journal.
United States
17 Mar 2017
3
CT Court Holds Communications Between Public Agency And Attorneys Not Always Exempt From FOIA
The CT Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) provides an exemption from disclosure for "communications privileged by the attorney-client relationship."
United States
6 Sep 2016
4
The Discovery Rule Applies To Resurrect Consumer Fraud Claim On Property Sale
The six-year statute of limitations was effectively tolled until the plaintiff discovered the wrongdoer knew of the falsity of the statement and intended the plaintiff to rely on it.
United States
23 Aug 2016
5
White Collar Roundup - August 2014
In United States v. Flores-Mejia, the en banc U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit implemented a new requirement to preserve a sentencing error for appeal.
United States
6 Aug 2014
6
Second Circuit Says Government Can't Seize Electronic Data Now, Keep It Forever, And Search It Later
When law enforcement officials execute warrants for electronic data, they usually create a mirror image of hard drives and other electronic storage media.
United States
26 Jun 2014
7
Supreme Court Allows Public Employer Search of Text Messages
On June 17, 2010, the United States Supreme Court issued its much-anticipated decision in "City of Ontario v. Quon", holding that a police department did not violate the Fourth Amendment when it searched an employee's text messages for a legitimate work-related purpose.
United States
23 Jun 2010
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