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Searching Content indexed under Disclosure & Electronic Discovery & Privilege by Fasken ordered by Published Date Descending.
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Be Careful With Sensitive Tax Information!
The Federal Court's recent decision in Atlas Tube Canada ULC v MNR showcases an important advantage that lawyers bring to multi-disciplinary teams working on corporate transactions, namely solicitor-client privilege.
Canada
11 Jan 2019
2
Shrinking The Privilege "Blanket" - Alberta Court Of Appeal Demands More Scrutiny Of Privilege Claims | The HR Space
Legal privilege is asserted in many ways, most commonly: (1) solicitor-client privilege, which attaches to communications between a client and a lawyer related to seeking or giving legal advice...
Canada
12 Oct 2017
3
Public Access To Lawyer's Accounts: Are We Seeing A Two-Tier Application Of Professional Secrecy?
In theory, solicitor-client privilege is constitutional or quasi-constitutional in nature, as it would be protected, depending on the circumstances, by either the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Canada
26 Jul 2017
4
L'accès Public Aux Comptes D'honoraires Des Avocats : Vers Une Application Deux Poids Deux Mesures Du Secret Professionnel?
Le secret professionnel avocat-client est en principe de nature constitutionnelle ou quasi constitutionnelle, protégé qu'il serait selon les circonstances...
Canada
11 Jul 2017
5
Confidentiality In The Litigation Process: The Implied Undertaking, Confidentiality And Sealing Orders
This paper addresses the confidentiality of material disclosed in the course of legal proceedings in the Supreme Court of British Columbia.
Canada
8 Jul 2011
6
E-Discovery – The Changing Face Of Litigation
Generally, every party to a lawsuit is required to list all "records" (the physical representation or record of any information, data or other thing that is or is capable of being represented or reproduced visually or by sound, or both) in its possession that are relevant and material to the issues in the lawsuit. If a party fails to do so, or destroys such a record, it may face serious consequences, ranging from orders to pay the costs of the other party, to adverse inferences being drawn again
Canada
 
5 Jun 2007
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