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Searching Content indexed under Constitutional & Administrative Law by Leigh Hansson ordered by Published Date Descending.
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Russian Companies Penalized Under Iran Nonproliferation Act
On Aug. 4, 2006, the State Department issued sanctions against seven companies under the Iran Nonproliferation Act of 2000. Two prominent Russian companies—Rosoboronexport, the Russian state arms export company, and Sukhoi, a leading Russian aerospace and defense contractor—were named on this list which also included companies from North Korea, Cuba, and India.
United States
15 Dec 2006
2
U.S. Lifts Libya’s Terrorist Designation
It was almost two years ago that President Bush terminated the national emergency with Libya, effectively ending the United States’ longstanding unilateral embargo on that country. While this decision represented a major step forward in the normalization of trade relations between the countries, it did not remove all obstacles to doing business with Libya.
United States
15 Sep 2006
3
Export, Customs & Trade Enforcement Highlights, Summer 2006
Ingersoll-Rand Company of Woodcliff Lake, N.J. entered into a settlement agreement with BIS under which it will pay a $680,000 civil penalty to settle charges of improperly exporting diaphragm pumps, without the required license, to India and Israel, by misrepresenting facts on an SED, and acting with knowledge that a violation would occur.
United States
15 Sep 2006
4
One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: The New Proposed Rule For Export, Reexport & Transfers To The People’s Republic Of China
In 2005, United States companies exported approximately $41 billion worth of items to the People’s Republic of China. During that same time period, American business concerns reportedly lost an estimated $12.5 billion in potential export revenue.
United States
 
15 Sep 2006
5
Export, Customs & Trade - Enforcement Highlights
On October 5, 2005, the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security ("BIS") entered an order under which ProChem (Proprietary), Limited ("ProChem") (as the successor to Protea Chemicals (Proprietary), Limited ("Protea")) of South Africa, agreed to pay $1,540,000 in civil penalties to settle charges that Protea had committed 220 violations of the Export Administration Regulations ("EAR") from 1999 to 2003 in connection with exports of potassium cyanide and sodium cyanide to South Afri
United States
7 Apr 2006
6
No News Is Good News: BIS Retains Status Quo on Deemed Export Rule
The Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security recently decided to maintain the status quo in its "deemed export" rule, which imposes control of sensitive technology based on a foreign national’s most recent country of citizenship or permanent residence. In maintaining the current rule, BIS has rejected its own Office of Inspector General ("OIG") recommendation to change the rule to the foreign national’s country of birth. In its recommendation, the OIG expressed concern that the cu
United States
7 Apr 2006
7
Export, Customs & Trade - Enforcement Highlights
The U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry of Security ("BIS"), announced on July 28, 2005 that the Chattanooga Group Inc. ("CGI"), a division of Encore Medical Corporation based in Hixson, Tennessee, will pay a $101,000 civil penalty to settle administrative charges that it committed 13 violations of the Export Administration Regulations ("EAR") in connection with unauthorized exports of physical therapy equipment from the United States to Iran via Australia without the required export
United States
30 Nov 2005
8
UN Trade Sanctions After the Oil-for-Food Program
On October 27, 2005, the United Nations ("UN") released its final report (the "Report") on the investigation of the Oil-for-Food Program ("OFFP"). In addition to highlighting certain structural deficiencies, the Report identified more than 2,200 companies that paid bribes or kickbacks to the Iraqi government in violation of the OFFP. Without issuing a final verdict, the Report essentially provided a roadmap for interested national law enforcement authorities to follow by naming those companies t
United States
30 Nov 2005
9
FinCEN Issues New Anti-Money Laundering Rule For Dealers in Precious Metals, Precious Stones, And Jewels
In the aftermath of 9/11 and the war on terror, the USA PATRIOT Act called for all financial institutions, as so defined by the Bank Secrecy Act, to establish comprehensive anti-money laundering compliance programs. Since the BSA identified more than 20 different types of financial institutions, many of which had no prior experience in establishing such a program, the Treasury Department’s Financial Crime Enforcement Network decided to introduce this requirement in stages.
United States
3 Aug 2005
10
When a Disclosure may not be Voluntary: Liability for Trade Violations and Sarbanes-Oxley
Companies with international trade operations are required to navigate a complex web of laws and regulations, governed by a multitude of government agencies. Corporate officers must make difficult decisions regarding when to disclose export and other trade violations to the government in hopes of avoiding or reducing what could otherwise be severe liability.
United States
 
1 Aug 2005
11
Lose Your Clearance, Lose Your Contract, Lose Your Company
One of the most valuable commodities held by a federal government contractor is its employees holding active personnel security clearances. Greater contracting opportunities across the federal government have only served to increase the value of these cleared employees by keeping companies competitive for government projects where access to classified information is necessary to perform tasks or services essential to the fulfillment of the contract. In many cases, the inability of specific contr
United States
23 Mar 2005
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